We’ve talked a lot about how trying this COVID-19 season has been for entrepreneurs. Investors are facing similar yet different challenges, learning how to be predictive about a business’ success in the face of unprecedented uncertainty. And yet, as with any moment in time, there is still abundant opportunity. How to mitigate new types of risk and identify flowers amongst the weeds? A few of today’s top investors share their best advice on how to prepare investment portfolios for the next decade – with all of its expected trends and its propensity for ups and downs.

1. Rudy Medina, founder of Next Space Development

Medina is a top investor in real estate. With new potential lockdowns ahead of us as we await a vaccine, and with the national sense of “wanderlust” following many months in lockdown, Medina foresees changes to people’s preferences for where they want to live as a result. These living changes include privacy, additional outdoor or flex areas, room for pets outside of the living area, and close proximity to a city or neighborhoods recreational activities. Even though the threat of lockdowns will eventually cease, the pandemic at large has put a greater emphasis on homes and a home space. 

2. Salvatore Buscemi, Managing Director at Dandrew Capital Partners

In Buscemi’s real estate investment portfolio, he specializes in managing risk, which is especially important to assess in a new light today. His advice is rooted in mitigating risk through research and extensive experience, calling it a “defensive play.”  This isn’t the time for guessing or swinging for the fences: rely on research mixed with insight whenever possible. That will provide for greater feelings of security in the upcoming years, and also greater returns.

3. Mary Meeker, General Partner, Bond Capital

Mary Meeker and Bond Capital raised $1.25 billion in capital commitments in 2019 alone, and Meeker was an early investor herself in rapid-growth startups like Instacart, Square, AirBNB and many other ‘unicorns.’ What stands out about Meeker’s keen eye is her yearly ‘Internet Trends’ report, which comes out every Spring. The sheer amount of research and attention to potential internet trends has been crucial in Meeker’s astuteness in her investment decision-making skills. When in doubt, research more, and research through  mediums that others may not readily think about (i.e., Internet trends).  

4. Sloan Foster, Founder Of AutoThinkUSA

Foster has built a business on one core principle: convenience. Operating by the belief that consumers will always choose the most convenient accommodations, she has applied this advice to the upcoming decade through essential businesses. “Think through all of the businesses that have soared in profitability as a result of the pandemic. These essential businesses aren’t just ‘essential’ during lockdown – it’s a hint at just how essential they are year-round,” she advises. 

4. Jeremy Delk, Founder of Delk Enterprises

What business models have held true and stable during COVID-19? Which new ones have recently been created? Chaos and crisis is the soil for truly great innovations – so keep your eyes peeled.  “Utilize this time to adapt quickly in your investments, according to how companies are adapting,” said Delk. “Specifically, look into how you can stay relevant by adhering to new tele-health technologies.” This piece of advice is reminiscent of a larger trend: the world’s switch to remote work.

5. Nisa Leung, Managing Principal, Qiming Venture Partners

Through Qiming Venture Partners, Leung and team have invested in successful companies such as CanSino (Chinese vaccine maker) and Venus MedTech. Leung sees one major red flag in entrepreneurs seeking investment: those who just want to make a “quick buck.” While the Qiming Venture Partners have a tendency towards investing in healthcare companies, they specifically look at companies poised for a long term vision, as most entrepreneurs don’t need nearly as much capital as they think. Prioritize investments in long term visions, not short term “build and exit” visions.

6. Rohan Sheth, Co-Founder Of Growrev 

As marketing has gone through a new learning curve, too, don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Sheth advises harnessing the power of multiple marketing channels.  “When you expand marketing channels, your businesses will inevitably boom with new abundance” said Sheth. “Perhaps most important is the amount of traffic that is run through each platform and zeroing in on capturing the greatest return on investment.   My company has been built off the tremendous success of our clients’ campaigns. At Growrev, we believe the devil is in the details and when you master that game, the professional rewards are endless.”

7. Allison Gaddy, eXp Realty

Gaddy and her partner, Don Hobbs, work together through a value investment strategy, tailored at helping them to build wealth while also enjoying their lives. It’s worked – they have invested in a series of properties in markets that have solid growth potential that have delivered significant cash flow combined with a substantial increase in value throughout the last 15 consecutive years.  “As a real estate agent and residential re-developer, I focus on opportunities where I can leverage my industry expertise to unearth long-term value,” she shared. “Investing in rental properties paired with real estate development has yielded the highest returns.” 

7. Bobby Dillard, Co-founder of Cielo Property Group 

Dillard sees a great opportunity for recognizing blind spots during this year’s chaos. “Huddle together and look at where you were prepared, and where you weren’t prepared,” Dillard explains. Within a business portfolio, take a close and careful look at how entrepreneurs and business owners are taking personal responsibility for their blind spots, and notice who is looking for opportunity rather than solely trying to crisis manage.”

8. Monique Idlett, Managing Partner, Reign Ventures

Idlett is the founder of Reign Ventures, a $25 million fund that works to “change the narrative around entrepreneurship.” Specifically, she helps young businesswomen to invest early in startups to secure (or raise the chances of securing) a seat on the business’ board. In Idlett’s spirit of empowerment and quick thinking: jump in fast when you feel called to a business’s mission and business model. 

9. Jeff Sekinger, Founder Of 0percent.com 

Sekinger recommends leveraging business debt if these times have been particularly hard on a company financially. His company provides funding, credit repair, and insurance. “Everyone is just trying to stay afloat right now – take advantage of every potential resource that can help,” he advised. “Of course, first make sure that you’ll be able to repay any loans or investments that you take out. Now is the time to bring laser focus into your business’ value.” 

10. Sara Blakely, Founder of Spanx

Sara Blakely started her Spanx empire with her own money: $5,000 in savings. And, still, to date, she owns 100% of the company. This is because she stayed debt free. Seek investment opportunities and other entrepreneurs who believe so fervently in their company that they’re willing to bootstrap as much as possible, while also putting in the research.

11. Drew Evans, CEO Of Caifu Property

Evans and his partner have brought in tens of millions of dollars in residential real estate investments, focusing on one magic phrase: cash-flow positive. “Seek to build a portfolio that sets you up, not sets you back,” Evans explained. “This type of calculated risk will help you ride out these harder years, and put you on the winning side. This type of calculated risk will help you ride out these harder years, and put you on the winning side eventually.” 

12. Geraldine Weiss, Investor Advisor

Weiss built a name for herself by building her own investment newsletter in 1966 when no investment firm wanted to hire her as anything more than a secretary under a gender-neutral name, “G. Weiss.” Now, many decades later, she has paved the way for more women in the investing industry through her shrewd predictions and viable investment advice. Weiss sticks by her sage advice to choose stock investments based on both values and dividends

13. Marco Soriano , Soriano Group 

Marco Soriano, Chief Investment Officer of the  Soriano Group, has quite the diverse portfolio: motorcycles, hotels in distress, fintech, blockchain, and AI. There’s a tendency right now to watch the market closely and hop on trends when they’re noticed. Soriano urges against this, because herd mentality doesn’t provide sufficient opportunity for big wins. “Buy when others are holding and selling,” he encourages. “Watch the trends, then do the opposite. This has worked for me and my group for four generations.” 

14. Sallie Krawcheck, CEO Of Ellevest

Krawcheck is the former CFO of Citi Bank, and is now CEO of investment platform Ellevest, which is geared towards women. When asked about investing during a pandemic, Krawcheck advises to stay focused on your personal investing goals (think: that house, your eventual startup, wedding, vacation, you name it) rather than hopping to the changing trends in today’s market. “Any advice that says, ‘take action,’ shouldn’t be taken,” she warns.

15.  Ian Dunlap, Founder Of Hyper Acceleration

Dunlap has invested in companies such as Amazon, Tesla, Apple, Microsoft, and more — and his own interest in investing comes out of the 2008 financial crisis. He now shares plentiful investment advice to bridge the gap between the investing world and the general public. One of his sage pieces of advice for the upcoming decade is the “number one rule of investing” – do not lose money. “Losing money is a cancer to your account. If you get this right, the return will take care of itself. Most people treat their portfolio like cash in Vegas and they are outright gambling and not using discipline to get in the right areas of the market,” he advises. 

16. Barbara Corcoran, The Corcoran Group

Barbara Corcoran of The Corcoran Group and Shark Tank has one piece of advice that has served her long and colored investing history: betting on herself. For the upcoming decade, this advice still rings true. She’s stated that more so than any bond or stock market, she has confidence in herself – which makes sense, because you know yourself and your strengths most of all. Think through a product or service that you can put into the world, and invest where you have total control (over your own business).

17. Iman Shafiei, Founder Of Keystone Investors

Iman Shafiei urges an optimistic spin on the market’s current roller coaster ride. “This is a great time for people to put aside some money and seek out investment opportunities, since so much is changing so quickly,” he shared. “I always advise you to learn about cryptocurrency as a potential investment… especially with the increase of globalization. The global economy is going to become more and more important. 

18. Kathy Xu, Founding Partner, Capital Today

Xu has over 25 years of investing experience on her belt, and through everything she’s seen and experienced, she brings her focus back to the people behind a company. She helps entrepreneurs with what she calls the “three weapons” – branding, the team, and the culture. Orient your success in your team dynamic – and if you invest in startups, look at the team culture of each business. This is where success can be quite evident.

19. Sarah Kunst, Managing Director – Cleo Capital

Sarah Kunst is the managing director of Cleo Capital, and served as a senior advisor at Bumble. Kunst has shared that one of the main aspects she looks for in a business is its positioning on the ‘Maslow Hierarchy of Needs.’ The more a customer needs a product, the lower that product would rank — and the more profitable it would be. She shared on the Modern Retail podcast that the product should be the answer to, “What will make me feel better in the moment?” Think through your product’s value proposition through this lens.

20. Thomas Graham, Crosswind Media and Public Relations

When investing in your own startup, make sure to look for massive ROI opportunities that may not be immediately ‘measurable’ or ‘provable.’ Graham says that public relations can bolster a company’s reputation or bring it into the spotlight in a way that just marketing or ads couldn’t — and this provides when he calls an “intangible ROI.” Of course, it’s important to see generally how this benefits you, but when positioned correctly, all PR really can be good PR.

Some of these pieces of advice may stand out to you more than others, but one thing is for sure: they should all be highly considered, as these investors have skin in the game while navigating the uncertain years ahead.



Source Google News